Skip to content
May 1, 2016 / cdsmith

CodeWorld/Summer of Haskell Update

Reminder: The deadline for Summer of Haskell submissions is this Friday, May 6.

One slot in Summer of Haskell this year will specifically be chosen based on CodeWorld.  If you plan to submit a proposal for CodeWorld, please feel free to contact me with any questions, concerns, or for early feedback.  I’ll definitely try my best to help you write the best proposal possible.  So far, I’m expecting three to four CodeWorld proposals that I’m aware of.

Q&A

What is Summer of Haskell?

Summer of Haskell is a program by the Haskell.org committee to encourage students to spend the summer contributing to open-source projects that benefit the Haskell community.  That encouragement comes in the form of a stipend of US$5500.  More details are at http://summer.haskell.org.

How is CodeWorld related to Summer of Haskell?

The Haskell.org committee will choose a number of student projects based on their impact to the Haskell community.  As part of this, one project will be chosen specifically relating to CodeWorld, and funded by CodeWorld maintainers.

Should I submit a proposal?

It’s up to you, but I believe you should submit a proposal if:

  • You are eligible (see the bottom of the Summer of Haskell info page).
  • You are willing and available to take on an essentially full-time commitment for the summer.
  • You have a realistic idea you’d like to work on to benefit the Haskell community.

Any advice for writing a proposal?

Yes!  Here are things you should keep in mind:

  1. Propose a project with immediate impact on real people.  “If you build it, they will come” doesn’t work here.  Unless you have an extremely good reason, don’t propose to build something speculative and hope people will just like it so much that they adopt it.  Point to real people who already want this, and who will already be users and will find their lives better if and when it’s completed.
  2. Demonstrate that you understand the task.  Provide enough detail to convince us that the project is feasible.  A reasonable and concrete timeline with at least rough deliverables is a good idea.  Poorly defined projects with a low probability of success are often not good fits for this format.
  3. Show that you are already becoming a part of the community you’ll be working with.  Are you familiar with the project you’re proposing to contribute to?  Do core people in the project and/or the Haskell community know who you are?  Have you discussed your ideas with people already involved in the project?  Do you know someone who would be your mentor?

You can browse successful projects from last year.  There’s also some good advice by Edward Kmett in an old mailing list thread.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: